25 or 19 to 4

25 years on

Twenty-five years ago, 1994, Woodstock 94 celebrated the 25th anniversary of Woodstock, Justin Bieber was born, Nirvana played their final concert, Pink Floyd embark on the Division Bell which would be their last world tour, Johnny Cash released The American recordings and Captain Tractor release Land, their first album.

To commemorate 25 years of recordings Captain Tractor have treated us a gorgeous double album containing a sampling of songs that represent the non-stop party that they are. From Pitcairn Island to someplace East of Eden, Captain Tractor Bought The Farm North of the Yellowhead and managed to score a Hat Trick while negotiating a Celebrity Traffic Jam. 9 albums and countless happy fans later they are 25 Years On.

If you like Captain Tractor you will fall head over heels for this retrospective that covers material from the last 25 years into one impressively packaged two record pressing. Completely re-mastered with four new tracks recorded in February 2018 with Nik Kozub at The Audio Department in Edmonton, two unreleased tracks from the vaults, and seventeen past tracks spanning our first album Land, to 2015’s Live at the Roxy

This limited edition pressing in gray splattered vinyl comes in a spiffy double sleeve and sounds amazing, I score it a home run and we are all winners for listening to good music.

Lucy Pearl.jpeg

19 years ago Lucy Pearl released their self-titled album to rave reviews. Lucy Pearl was a supergroup that released just this one album, so for those of us who have been crate-digging trying to find a nice clean pressing, your wait is over. Freshly pressed in jet black vinyl this repressing will be sure to please fans of R&B, soul, hip-hop (Snoop Dogg collaborated) and neo-soul. It is impossible to refrain from getting into the groove and grooving to the tunes on these records.

So there we have it 4 records between these to recordings that cover 25 years of Captain Tractor and 19 years of Lucy Pearl. That completes the 25 or 19 to 4, happy listening everyone.

The Music Is The Medium

rock and roll will save your life

I am reading “Rock and Roll Will Save Your Life” by Steve Almond and he devoted several pages to the evolution of listening to music that has transpired within our lifetimes. Yes, we both acknowledge this dates us but we are OK with it because it also means we have listened to a truckload of music.

I don’t agree with some of Steve’s chronology so I will just offer a vague summary of his list: The radio era, the phonographic era, the 8 track era, the cassette era, the CD era, and last but not least, the digital era.

This isn’t a bad list but I think it is overly simplistic, however, I am not here to debate the various era’s of music, what I do want to talk about is how we listened to music differently through those eras.

I would offer another era to this list, the era of live music which predates any of these recording methods and is still going strong, just different. When I was a young lad my Dad played the guitar at home and at parties. There were wedding dances, high school dances and impromptu music wherever musicians gathered. And gather they did, we had family reunions, music at campsites, and even at a funeral. My Dad’s remembrance service was close to 3 hours long and half a dozen musical groups played a tribute to my Dad for his contributions to live music over the years.

Live music was the only way to listen to music until technology started giving us a plethora of recording methods that allowed us to experience music where ever and whenever we wanted to listen to it.

There are more than enough history lessons on the various ways that sound, and music, have been recorded so I won’t replicate what others have done. What I will do is talk about how listening has changed for me.

After the live music, there was the radio which people listened to for much more than just music. CFCW was our local country and western station and they catered to the farmers and ranchers as well as those of us who enjoyed the country music. CBC had talk shows and of course, Hockey Night In Canada on Saturday, I cheered for the Leafs because my Dad cheered for the Leafs. As a teenager I listened to 630 CHED which played pop music, I can remember listening to The Archies sing “Sugar Sugar” as we drove home after school. K-97 played music on FM starting in 1979, they introduced me to more than one album over the years and I contributed mixtapes to them that they played on-air and gave me some albums in exchange.

I had purchased my first piece of vinyl in 1968, “Crimson and Clover” by Tommy James and the Shondells. I picked that gem up in Vancouver while there on vacation and visiting my cousin Wayne. I returned the next summer and bought my first full-length LP, Best of the Bee Gees, and that purchase is where I lead off on my topic of how we listen to music.

I played that record over and over, my parents let me use their record player in my bedroom and I took full advantage of that freedom. In November of 1969, I bought my second full album and I listened to it over and over. Summer of 1970 and I bought more records, Montreal had a very nice record shop that introduced me to “Déjà Vu”  by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young” as well as “In the Court of the Crimson King” by a band that is still very high on my favourites list, King Crimson.

Anyhow, listening. How did I listen to music in the decade of the 1970s? I listened intently, I hung on every word. We didn’t have https://genius.com/ to find the lyrics for us so without lyrics printed on the inner sleeve we listened intently, trying to hear every word and string them together for a musical story within each song and sometimes through a whole album. I listened for the sounds that the different instruments played within the songs, how they ebbed and flowed and added texture to the song. I read the liner notes for every tidbit of information such as who produced the album, who played what instrument (s), where it was recorded, etc.

I listened intently over and over until I knew those records start to finish. It was often a long time between record stores so I got my money’s worth out of every album that I bought.

And then cassette tapes came along and that changed the way I listened and interacted with music. I made mixtapes, yes, they were a real thing and not just in The Guardians of the Galaxy. I would listen to albums over and over and then put select songs on tape that I could listen to in the cassette deck in my car. Music became mobile and not just on the radio, I was now able to listen to what I wanted when I wanted it.

I bought my first set of headphones in 1973 and that also altered the way I experienced sound. They were quadraphonic which also changed the way I heard music. The technology was moving forward at an accelerated rate compared to the advances of the previous couple of hundred years.

I had an 8 track someplace within the late 1970s but I never got into that format very deep. The next leap was to CD’s in 1985, they were introduced to the public in 1982 but I waited a few years for the price to come down and my wages to go up, which both accommodated me favourably. I didn’t sell off my records to buy CDs as many people did, I kept my records spinning and added CDs as an alternate for listening. The biggest change that CDs made to my listening was the ability to listen to a whole album start to finish without having to get up and flip it, I could now listen to 80 minutes of music non-stop. The trade-off was the size of the packaging, I could barely read the liner notes because they were so small on a CD, compared to those on a record.

The biggest change in my listening habits had nothing to do with formats. I listened to all the formats, but I didn’t listen to them the same way in the 1990s as I did in the 1970s and that is still true, up until now.

I added albums to my collection at a dizzying rate and by 1989 I had accumulated 999 records and was on my way to similar numbers in CDs and cassettes but that accumulation came at a cost, I now listened to more volume but less content. I was listening to more and more music but paying less and less attention to what I was listening to and with the advent of digital music, I had even more content but less listening. So I made a decision to listen to some music in much the same way as I had in the embryonic days of my music listening. I left the CD in the player for days on end and listened to the same album over and over, just like I did for Best of the Bee Gees. I picked 20 albums and I listened intently to them.

So, in no particular order, here is what I listened to and how I reacted to the music that I loved so much in years gone by.

  1. Déjà Vu by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. This recording has been on my turntable for 49 years, 7 months, 20 days, and I still love to hear it, start to finish, over and over again.
  2. Kiln House by Fleetwood Mac. This is the only album by them that I listen to over and over again.
  3. Surrealistic Pillow by Jefferson Airplane. This is another band that I only listen to one album of theirs, White Rabbit isn’t the only good song on the album.
  4. No Guru, No Method, No Teacher by Van Morrison. This is his sixteenth album and it was released in 1986, I bought it on CD before buying the vinyl.
  5. American Pie by Don Mclean. Yes, I bought it for “the song”, but I do listen to the whole album, just not as intently as “the song”.
  6. Lust For Life by Iggy Pop. I love this album, start to finish. It’s a good listen for driving down the highway in the summer.
  7. Sticky Fingers by The Rolling Stones. I still consider this as the Stones best recording.
  8. Avalon by Roxy Music. Released in 1982, this was their eighth and final studio album but the first and only recording that I have of them.
  9. Harvest by Neil Young. This came out in 1972, I bought it sometime around 1975 and saw him live in 1984. I still consider this the highest point in his musical career.
  10. A Space In Time by Ten Years After. I bought this on vinyl in quadraphonic sound. It sounded amazing with headphones and still sounds good in stereo.
  11. I Ain’t Easy by Long John Baldry. Saw him live in 1979 but he didn’t play a single song off this album which disappointed me because I loved this on vinyl.
  12. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band by The Beatles. I don’t remember when or where I bought this album but I have listened to it a gazillion times.
  13. Buffalo Springfield by Buffalo Springfield. I bought it “For What It’s Worth” but have listened to it until I am “Going Out Of My Mind”.
  14. Wanted! The Outlaws by Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Jessi Colter, and Tompall Glaser earned its place in music history by becoming the first country and western album to be platinum-certified, reaching sales of one million. I added to those sales twice.
  15. Sounds of Silence by Simon and Garfunkel. The sounds of record grooves eliminated the silence and the silence still plays.
  16. Crime of the Century by Supertramp. This album has not lost its lustre even though it isn’t quite the album of the century, that would be number 20 on this list.
  17. Who’s Next by The Who. Come on, I would have bought it just for the cover photo and kept it for the music.
  18. Fear of Music by Talking Heads. I remember hearing this on K-97, an FM station in Edmonton who used to play album rock, I bought it on cassette first and then on record, CD and digital. Yup, over and over and over.
  19. Aqua Lung by Jethro Tull, when this album came out my parents took a stance and they didn’t want me playing this record in their home, which of course meant I played it more, over and over.
  20. Dark Side of the Moon by Pink Floyd. This album was released in March of 1973, I graduated from grade 12 in June of 1973 and bought this album with my first paycheque in July of 1973. I have since purchased about a dozen copies of this album over the years in vinyl, cassette and CD. The format doesn’t matter because the music is the medium.

The music is the medium is a statement by Marshall McLuhan, meaning that the form of a message (print, visual, musical, etc.) determines the ways in which that message will be perceived. McLuhan argued that modern electronic communications (including radio, television, films, and computers) would have far-reaching sociological, aesthetic, and philosophical consequences, to the point of actually altering the ways in which we experience the world.

I agree wholeheartedly with Mr McLuhan, the end.

Norman’s Summer Music

 I finished reading David Bowie’s biography by Marc Spitz. It was a good read with plenty of references to songs that I liked listening to while reading the book, which is tricky because I only read the book in my car and I don’t distract and drive. Anyhoo, that’s another story for another day, let’s just say for now that I listened to Bowie over the last couple of months which brings us to the topic of this posting. Namely, what have I been listening to lately?

summer-songs-gathering-beauty

 Bowie, mostly his early to mid-career tunes. Space Oddity from his eponymous second album is still a great listen. Aladdin Sane is such a nice play on words, and The Jean Genie is as catchy today as it was in 1973, which is saying a lot because 1973 was the year I became a Drooling Fanatic (page 7 of Rock and Roll Will Save Your Life by Steve Almond).

 I think I started into Bowie in July, just back from a jaunt to London where I scored Alladin Sane on vinyl.

 These lads are insane. black midi, with their album Schlagenheim. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rc3LSW_XTwI

   I also scored Sons of Kemet, Your Queen Is A Reptile. Fresh sounds from the London jazz scene, thanks to Rough Trade Records.

 What else have I been listening to? Lots of New Wave (ish) music. Nick Lowe, Soft Cell, The Psychedelic Furs, That Petrol Emotion, etc. The mid to late eighties new wave scene has been on my playlists since, well, the mid to late eighties.

 Another band that never leaves my playlists are The Pink Floyd. I saw David Gilmore Live at Pompei on the big screen and then Roger Waters Us and Them on tour, on the big screen again, and in between those two stellar movies I read Nick Mason’s book, Inside Out. Which was as good as the movies, just a slower format.

 Another perennial favourite of mine is King Crimson, who I was very fortunate to see live at The Royal Albert Hall in London. And of course, I came home with hard copies of their music so I can keep listening to them.

 The Barr Brothers, saw them live and bought their CD’s and would pay to see them again.

 Flash And The Pan, a group from Australia that I keep playing at least once a year. The song Hey St. Peter is a favourite of mine.

 Talking Heads, Tom Waits, Joy Division, Tonio K., Van Morrison, Decemberists, Lifesavers, Michael Knott, The Swirling Eddies, Frank Zappa, … and the list goes on. A good chunk of this music dates me but I am comfortable with that.

 We Are The City, I liked them live. Spiritualized, And Nothing Hurt, a great piece of music. Nuella Charles, some very good homegrown talent on our homegrown vinyl plant, https://moonshotphonographs.com/.

 Low Roar, one of the best live shows I have ever seen and a darn good recording to boot. 

 Syd Arthur, tough to find hard copies of anything they have recorded but I managed to score Apricity on CD this summer.

 Godspeed You! Black Emperor, an amazing show, simply amazing. Their records are good but live… I don’t have enough superlatives.

 Russian Circles, a really good show that satisfied my heavy metal craving for that month. Best crowd award goes to the metalheads that were there that night.

 The Needs, some good Scandinavian power pop. Völuspa, aka Kirsten Knick delivers some Scandinavian synth-driven pop music.

 Rhye. I don’t know where to start. The spelling, yes that is spelled correctly, Rhye. The show, it was mesmerizing. I love it when all the ingredients come together and make the two hours fly by so fast it seems like the show just started, please don’t stop now!

 Cody Jinks. His new album, After The Fire, got me hooked on him and I went on a binge listening to his back catalogue. I am hooked on him now and I hope he tours up here in the great white north much like another country rebel, Sturgill Simpson, who also dropped another great album.

 Last but not least, The Lumineers, III. This album struck a chord with me due to its subject matter of addiction and messy lives.

So, that’s my summer and early fall listening, a new blog will be coming out early next week. Snapshot reviews. Until then, happy listening my friends.

Misplaced

Smooth as a field of freshly fallen snow and everywhere you look silver gems are twinkling. From Stockholm to the woods of northern Sweden boerd, aka, Bård Ericson, has hewn a delightful album, Misplaced, with vocals contributed by Stella (Brödet, Stella Explorer) that add a really nice element to the album.

boerd Misplaced

boerd may have felt misplace but he has crafted a nice laid back album of chill that I felt compelled to listen attentively to, more than once, in an attempt to catch all the nuances that fill the spaces between notes. There are a nice mix of electronica, Musique concrète, as well as “real” musical instruments, boerd masterfully weaves between the worlds of digital and analog, where we find boerd playing the guitar and cello.

As a regular member of the Royal Swedish Opera, Swedish Radio Symphony, and Stockholm Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Ericson has also proven himself as an accomplished double bass player for numerous ensembles around the world. His involvement is these classical ventures only adds to the otherworldly sound of his new album, Misplaced, which will be released

I highly recommend this for anyone who likes chill, ambient, shoe-gaze, contemplative, thoughtful, intelligent music. I am going to stop gushing superlatives all over this and go listen to it again. By the way, I give it a 9.5/10.

boerd released the single ‘Before We Drown’ ft. Stella Explorer on the 4th October via Anjunadeep, and the single “Look” dropped on October 29th, the full-length debut album ‘Misplaced’ arriving later this year.

‘Misplaced’ is available to pre-order now, digitally and on 12” vinyl through Anjunadeep.

https://music.anjunabeats.com/release/142271-boerd-misplaced

It is available for streaming on Soundcloud and iTunes.

https://soundcloud.com/anjunadeep/sets/boerd-misplaced-dns/s-xkLRK

 ‘Live One Life’ 

Völuspa, aka Kirsten Knick, channels myth and magic on her spellbinding new single ‘Live One Life’ , which Paper Mag described as “catchy pop tunes that sound like fever dreams starring a coven of witches led by Stevie Nicks”.  Völsupa returns with the first single from her debut album due for release January 2020 via Icons Creating Evil Art

unnamed-22-2

‘Live One Life’ is like walking in a dream with a mesmerizing soundtrack and vocals that pull us deep into a catchy pop song that takes on the tough questions of life and death. Driving beats and swelling synth arrangements propel the song forward while Völsupa poses an eternal question on the song’s refrain – ‘Do we ever really die?’

There are no easy answers to such big questions, but ‘Live One Life’ remains hopeful and philosophical, and it is here Knick fully embodies the persona of Völsupa – all-mighty, all-knowing, eternal and omnipresent, as she announces to the listener ‘My love for you can never die.’

On her new single ‘Live One Life’, Knick submerges herself entirely in her alter ego as she looks directly to the Nordic mythical legend of ‘Völuspa’ for divine inspiration.

https://soundcloud.com/iconscreatingevilart/voluspa-live-one-life-1

The Line of Best Fit: “Tinged with delicate dream-pop, Völuspa’s calm pacing translates into a lullaby with the airy instrumentals that softly echo into the horizon.”

Paper Mag: “cerebral, but undeniably catchy pop tunes that sound like fever dreams starring a coven of witches led by Stevie Nicks.”

As Knick explains: “Völuspa speaks to your subconscious realm. The dreams, the nightmares, the old lovers, the future self, the past self and to the holiness inside of you. It haunts you and comforts you at the same time.” 

https://soundcloud.com/iconscreatingevilart/voluspa-live-one-life-1

https://open.spotify.com/track/1mqXnJs0wfArfvciRDGxau?si=njuY6amkRHOM35vS7fETrA

L I S T E N

https://soundcloud.com/iconscreatingevilart/voluspa-live-one-life-1

D I S C O V E R

https://open.spotify.com/artist/5z9RPGhAVZe8c6ki0MRIgX

https://www.voluspamusic.com/

https://www.instagram.com/kirstenknick/

https://twitter.com/Kirsten_Knick

https://www.facebook.com/voluspamusic

https://open.spotify.com/artist/4ChtTBF8lU2YYsuoTrquYn?si

https://soundcloud.com/saturday-monday

https://www.facebook.com/satmon/

Press enquires please contact james@mysticsons.com or dan@mysticsons.com 

You Need The Needs

You need The Needs. You really do, the Needs make great music. Pop-punk according to Apple Music. I lean a bit further towards pop than punk, although some songs cross the line that I drew in the shifting sands of genre naming.

The album, You Need The Needs, starts with a genuine pop-punk offering in the form of their radio-friendly single Summerbore. I Regret It and I’m Doing Fine are the next two songs which could be a statement of how I’ve been living my life, I regret it but I’m doing fine. After that sentence, I need a wake-up call, so we get the very pop easy listening of “Hey Wake Up”, in contrast to the slightly punk feel of the first three tracks.

Summerbore//2000 Clubmixx is a 28-second introduction to the guitar-driven She’ll Never Know, Do You Think, and I Believe In Sunday/Someday. This is followed by an interesting filler track called (love has moved on) that offers something of a bridge to the final songs “First to Go” & “Stay Home Friend”. Those are the final songs, there is however a final track, “Revisited”, which is a short instrumental that sounds like a mike got left on after the jazz club closed.

Lyrically The Needs are closer to ABBA than they are to The Clash, with more unrequited love than angst. If you want a fun album to listen to while driving with the music on and the windows down, You Need The Needs is all you need.

The Needs drop fun music from Noway on Jansen Records.

The Needs are:

Bendik Brænne – Guitar / Vocal

Maciek Ofstad – Guitar / Vocal

Mattis Brænne Wigestrand – Guitar

Knut Oscar Nymo – Bass / Vocal

Nils Jørgen Nilsen – Drums / Vocal

You can find them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/youneedtheneeds/

And you can purchase the music and support working musicians on Bandcamp https://youneedtheneeds.bandcamp.com/

Nashville Skyline

nashville skyline

This is the first in what I hope to be a series of album blogs. These will be album reviews in a relaxed and informal manner. My observations are not intended to be critical of the artists or their art, merely comments and observations and reconsiderations of albums that meant something to me at some point in my life, which is obviously why I bought the recording in the first place. I am using the Discogs randomizer to pick the albums for me and I hope to do one review per week. I will do multiple listens of the recording and probably on more than one format if they are available. I will also do some research on the history of the recordings and what relevant information that entails, at my discretion. I am trying to avoid reading other reviews because I feel that may taint my observations.

First up is a recording from 1969, which was a very good year in my life and in my music collection, the album is Nashville Skyline by Bob Dylan. This is the ninth studio album by Bob Dylan and shows a departure from the stylings of his previous recordings. The album that preceded Nashville Skyline was John Wesley Harding, an album that was well received by critics and fans alike and had a distinctly folk feel to it. The album that came after Nashville Skyline was Self Portrait, an album that alienated both fans and critics alike but has weathered the turbulence and has come to be fairly well regarded in the lexicon of Dylan. Nashville Skyline is between these two, it has elements of folk simply because it is very difficult to pigeon hole music like this, and it has a distinctly country and western feel that is different from the explosion of country rock that was flooding the world.

First off is the title that grabs me. I have seen the Nashville Skyline, walked it’s streets and listened to its music. So I have a connection to this recording before I hear a single note of music. I also have expectations because of the many, many C&W records that I have heard, Nashville Skyline does not disappoint.

The first note of music is Girl From The North Country, a duet with Johnny Cash. Their voices mesh interestingly. At times I can hear Johnny trying to match the cadence of Bob Dylan, a cadence that suits him well but is different from most other singers, including the very versatile voice of Johnny Cash. I can also hear Dylan holding back to allow Cash to come along with his voice and Cash does, sometimes better than others but on the whole, it is a well-done interpretation of Olde English folk tune with an interesting pairing of musicians in Cash and Dylan.

The rest of the album seems to flow seamlessly with no further duets but extremely competent accompaniment by the musicians behind Dylans singing and playing, talented artists like Charlie Daniels on bass guitar, Pete Drake on pedal steel and Bob Wilson on keyboards. Having this level of veteran Country and Western musicians allowed Dylan the freedom to concentrate on singing in 4/4 time and playing a variety of instruments in accompaniment but not aggressively out front.

The lyrics speak of the basic human conditions, such as love that everyone sings about, especially C/W artists. They are either singing about being lonely and searching for love, being in love, or falling out of love. Dylan does not disappoint, Nashville Skyline is full of references to love, love lost, and a goose, but no dog.

Lay Lady Lay is arguably the most well-known song off the album, although I Threw It All Away and Tonight I’ll Be Staying Here With You were also released as singles. Lay Lady Lay hit 7 on Billboard and has been covered by a list of musicians that would fill this page.

A litmus test of music for me is how well the recording stands up to repeated listens and how well it ages. This recording has been in my collection for a long time, I do not remember when I bought the record, but I know it wasn’t in 1969, which is when the record came out. It must not have been too long after because the copy I have is a 1969 pressing, so it is before the reissues came out in the mid-’70s.

Regardless of when it came out, I have been listening to it for a good number of years and still enjoy it. For this blog, I listened to it multiple times on vinyl, CD and digital. Nashville Skyline passes both of the tests with ease. In fact, I think I’ll listen to it again today just for the pure enjoyment of listening to it again.

Take away observations; this is a very good record with some stellar musicianship, just listen to the instrumentation and try to block the lyrics in your head. The pedal steel and drumming blow me away. For another listen ignore the interments and focus on the lyrics and what they say to you or interest you. And then listen to it in a relaxed manner, such as reading a book or doing a hobby, and just bask in the pleasure of hearing music and singing at a level that many strive for but few attain.

Album Review: Alice Phoebe Lou – Paper Castles

On her second full-length release, fire dancer turned singer-songwriter Alice Phoebe Lou seamlessly combines cool jazz vibes and light indie tones to create a laidback yet intriguing album.

Across the entirety of Paper Castles, South African born Berlin-based Alice Phoebe Lou’s captivating vocals soar over atmospheric and lushly textured instrumentals. With evident influence from relaxed, lounge-friendly jazz, the steady percussion and electronic piano accompaniment on tracks like “New Song” mingle fluidly with Alice Phoebe Lou’s voice and flatly intonated guitars. While jazz is a dominating force for Paper Castle‘s sound, it also blends with distinctly indie ideals. Many tracks on Paper Castles veer towards the jangly guitars and softly textured synthesizers of bedroom pop. On “Galaxies” a muted guitar blends with synth textures to create a spacious indie track that is reminiscent of other bands such as Lowly.

Lyrically, Paper Castles maintains poignancy by relating tales of nostalgia, femininity, and maturing. On the previously released single “Something Holy” Alice Phoebe Lou relays her moment of overcoming “past traumas with sex, with men” and her more in-depth understanding of intimacy with one of the album’s most haunting mantras “It hasn’t been so easy being lonely.

Overall, the Noah Georgeson-produced Paper Castles is a cohesive, well-textured album that nicely showcases Alice Phoebe Lou’s vocal capabilities and writing skills. Its calming combination of jazz and indie conveys a sense of ataraxia while still maintaining enough momentum to keep one interested.

4/5

-Joel Weatherly

Originally written for The Spill Magazine

Album Review: Cochemea – All My Relations

With nearly fifteen years of experience touring the world as a saxophonist with Sharon Jones & the Dap Kings, Cochemea Gastelum is no stranger to the musical world. Within his solo full-length All My Relations, Cochemea delves into spiritual jazz, varied percussion, and of course soaring saxophone.

One of the most initially apparent features of All My Relations is the heavy use of percussion and rhythm. Whether it’s the Indigenous-inspired “All My Relations” or the grooving “Song of Happiness”, percussive and enchanting rhythms are found throughout. Adding exta depth to the sound is the excellent use of stereo separation that helps to draw in the listener and add impact to the drums felt across the album. On “Asatoma”, percussion takes complete control which leads to a very atmospheric and minimalist sound that nicely offsets some of the album’s busier moments.

With Cochemea you expect excellent saxophone performances and All My Relations certainly delivers some pleasing sax solos and riffs. Of particular note is the song “Seyewailo” in which the saxophone has effects laid upon it allowing for some unique tones and cosmic jazz textures.

With such varying influences and textures, All My Relations is an undeniably interesting spiritual jazz album that should fit perfectly within Daptone’s stellar catalogue.

4/5

-Joel Weatherly

Originally written for The Spill Magazine